Discussion:
Help with Identification of this Souvenir Spoon
(too old to reply)
The Campanian Society
2014-09-11 01:20:48 UTC
Permalink
Greetings. Help with the identification of this souvenir spoon -- marked "Argo" is requested.
For pictures of this souvenir spoon, please go to:

http://www.campanian.org/_public/Argo-Help-Spoon.html

Thanks for the help.

If additional information about this souvenir spoon is required, please send e-mail to: ***@hvc.rr.com


RMWilhelm
---------

Campanian Society Inc. & American Spoon Collectors

P.O. Box 243
Rhinecliff, NY 12574
Telephone: 845-876-0303
Fax: 845-876-0303
E-mail: ***@hvc.rr.com
Website: http://www.campanian.org
Ralph Hancock
2014-09-11 02:13:28 UTC
Permalink
I've looked up the verbal heraldic description of the shield -- per pale
azure and gules, on the first an antique bow (?)or -- in whole and in part,
and there is nothing like it on the web. This is not all that surprising,
as it breaks the rule of tincture by having two adjacent colours; a colour
should only be next to a metal or a fur. Also it doesn't have a proper
crest. It seems to be a made-up shield and not a genuine grant of arms.

RH
Mark Davidson
2014-09-11 03:22:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ralph Hancock
it breaks the rule of tincture by having two adjacent colours
No, the rule of tincture applies to charges on the field, not to the
divisions of the field.

A metal may not be placed upon a metal, nor a colour upon a colour.
However, a metal may be placed next to a metal, and a colour next to a
colour.

The concept is that divisions of the field are considered to be 'next to'
each other. e.g. per pale, per fess, per bend, per saltire, quarterly, etc.

Charges such as the ordinaries, subordinaries, and others are considered to
be 'on top of' the field.

So "azure, a pale gules" breaks the rule of tincture.
But "per pale azure and gules" does not.

e.g. The arms of Powell are "Per pale azure and gules, three lions rampant
argent."

The bow appears to be a Scythian bow.

I agree that the arms are probably made-up, because plain gules on the
sinister side doesn't look to me like genuine heraldry. Genuine arms would
either have the bow in the middle across the division, or else have some
other charge on the sinister side. That side wouldn't be empty.

Mark

Loading...